Amazon is Going to Need a Warehouse to Store all of it Products.

Amazon is Going to Need a Warehouse to Store all of it Products.

Think your business’ supply chain logistics issues are overwhelming? In recent news, Amazon will be opening an Operations Center of Excellence in Nashville, Tennessee in efforts to optimize its ultra-complex supply chain – one that delivered 5-billion packages in 2017 through Prime alone.

Hello, Paycheck!

Announced alongside its HQ2 location on November 13th, the Nashville operations center is expected to add 5,000 white-collar jobs to the area, sourcing talent from the flourishing region. Considered an up-and-coming locale and hosting a booming job market, the city saw an influx of more Millennials from 2010-2015 than NYC, marking its illustrious reputation as a popular destination. With the potential for an Amazon job with a median salary of $158,000 these figures may continue to rise.

Hot Market

Already a hub for the healthcare industry, many supply chain gurus already call Nashville home, with companies like Dollar General and Tractor Supply likewise utilizing the area as the home-base of their (industry-lauded) supply chain operations. Of course, it doesn’t hurt that schools with leading logistics programs like Auburn and University of Tennessee are nearby. The area is simply in an ideal locale for sourcing and retaining talent.

Room-to-Grow

Could a mega-warehouse be next? Break out your motorized trailer dollies! While Nashville may not a perfect fit, there’s a chance that it may offer a decent market for future warehouses, with access to seaports in Georgia and the Carolina’s. But its not as ideal as the 80-acre warehouse location opening next year in Tucson, Arizona, or prospective locations in Louisville, Kentucky; Charlotte, North Carolina; or Reno, Nevada. Employing 1,500 people, fulfillment sites comprise 20% of Amazon’s workforce.

Location tapped-out? Streamline your operations, boosting efficiency and productivity with the help of motorized trailer dollies from DJ Products today.