The Hospitality Industry

The Hospitality Industry

Hospitality leaders agree: lifestyle hotels are more than a passing fad. The new norm focuses on guest experience and upscale communal features like critically acclaimed restaurants and WiFi friendly lobby seating.

Travelers want their hotel to be a desirable place to hang out, and “have a room upstairs.” The results can vary depending on the target market (young millennials, business travelers, international tourists) but the emphasis on a unique experience runs across the board.

A recent profile of the Freehand Hotels shows how the new chain learned from its first project, a hostel-style boutique in Miami with private and shared rooms. Guests loved the community lounge spaces but strongly preferred private rooms. Freehand changed gears for its subsequent hotels, moving away from shared bathrooms but keeping the lounge spaces.

Pod Hotels in New York City show the same commitment to the “lifestyle” concept. Guests are greeted by a twenty-something concierge dressed to go DJ at a nightclub — and find themselves immersed in a trendy bar scene before reaching the front desk.

Mainstream hotels and business hotels are embracing lifestyle, too. Some spotlight the beauty of restored historic buildings, local artwork, or lobby filled with business productivity tools.

For hotel management, the shift toward lifestyle hotels means creating a consistent atmosphere. After  choosing new decor and lobby furniture, the hotel can streamline daily operations with new tools for hotel and hospitality cart movement. Employees work with motorized carts to get cleaning and maintenance done quickly — putting the best foot forward for the hotel’s lifestyle experience.

For more info on hotel and hospitality cart movement, visit DJ Products.com.